Bernie Sanders Goes off The Rails, Screams At CNN Reporter Manu Raju After The Correspondent Made The Mistake Of Asking Him A Question About His Campaign

Coronavirus has near everyone in the United States and the world in a state of panic with frayed nerves, including our leaders.

That could be the reason that Vermont Se. Bernie Sanders, a Democrat candidate for president, went off the rails on a CNN reporter.

CNN congressional correspondent Manu Raju asked Sanders about his flailing presidential campaign when the senator went after him.

“I’m dealing with a fucking global crisis,” Sanders said. “Right now I’m trying to do my best to make sure that we don’t have an economic meltdown and that people don’t die,”

“Is that enough for you to keep me busy for today?” the furious senator said to the CNN reporter on Wednesday.

Bernie Sanders when @mkraju asked his timeframe for a decision: “I’m dealing with a fucking global crisis.”

“Right now I’m trying to do my best to make sure that we don’t have an economic meltdown and that people don’t die. Is that enough for you to keep me busy for today?”

— Eric Bradner (@ericbradner) March 18, 2020

It comes after Super Tuesday II, which was swept by former Vice President Joe Biden which all but ended the Sanders campaign.

“Our campaign has had a very good night,” the former vice president said in a live stream done in his Delaware home.

“We move closer to securing the Democratic Party’s nomination for president and we’re doing it by building a broad coalition that we need to win in November,” he said.

This is a frightening time in America and it is wise for everyone to remain calm and take the precautions advised by the Centers For Disease Control.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick
Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.
Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
Throw used tissues in the trash.
Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
If you are sick:  You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

To disinfect:
Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. Use disinfectants appropriate for the surface.

Options include:

Diluting your household bleach.
To make a bleach solution, mix:
5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water
OR
4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.

Alcohol solutions.
Ensure solution has at least 70% alcohol.
Other common EPA-registered household disinfectants.
Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens pdf icon[7 pages]external icon claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).

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